There are hundreds of adjectives in the English language. There are both singelton and compound adjectives. In addition there are comparative and superlative adjectives.

 

developmental order

The following is a "best guess" scenario. It seems reasonable that single adjectives are used in an utterance before multiple adjectives are used. As children acquire perceptual characteristics of objects (see Categories and Exemplars below), they acquire adjectives to express their perceptions. We did not find a definitive developmental ordering of these perceptual characteristics in the literature, but were able to find the twelve major categories of meaning that are expressed with English adjectives. No attempt was made to order them, but common sense tells us that color, size, and shape adjectives are among the first to be used. Likewise, time, nationality, and purpose adjectives occur later in the acquisition of adjectives.

Of importance, is the notion that we teach single adjectives initially and then start combining strings of adjectives in utterances.

Comparative adjectives are likely acquired next as they function to compare just two attributes.

These may be followed developmentally by superlative adjectives as they are used to communicate more than two attributes.

Lastly, children begin to differentiate between using adjectives or adverbs in an utterance.

 

Important ConsiderationS

An adjective is a word that modifies or describes a noun or pronoun. An adjective can indicate what kind of, how many, whose, or which. The words "a" and "an" are called indefinite articles and the word "the" is a definite article. They are adjectives too.

In general, adjectives usually appear before the noun they modify or after a linking verb. For example: "That is a red ball" (adjective before the noun) or "That ball is red" (adjective after the linking verb)

Teaching adjectives by cognitive categories (adjective classes) may make it easier. The question then becomes, what categories and what exemplars within the categories are most appropriate?

 

Categories and exemplars of early developing single adjectives

The following are the twelve major categories of meaning that are expressed with English adjectives. A few exemplars are listed for each category, but there are several more possibilities.

COLOR: blue, red, green, brown, yellow, black, white, etc.

SIZE: big, small, little, long, tall, short, same as,

SHAPE: round ( a ball ), circle (a door knob), triangle, rectangle ( a flag ), square ( a block ), oval ( an egg ),

DISTANCE: long, short, far, around, start, high, low,

FEELINGS OR QUALITIES: good, pretty, right, good, old, better, best, full, funny, light, clean, new, fast, happy, sad, crooked, straight, noisy, quiet, full, empty, fast, slow, closed, open, soft, hard

QUANTITY: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, ten, many, few, all, some, every, any, first, once, much,

TEMPERATURE: cold, warm, hot, cool,

TIME: late, early, bed, nap, dinner, lunch, day, morning, night,

NATIONALITY or ORIGIN: American, Mexican,

MATERIAL: wooden, sharp, paper, cloth,

AGE: new, old, young, child, adult, baby, teenage,

PURPOSE: (These adjectives usually end in /ing/) sleeping bag, frying pan, swinging door,

Sites for practice with single adjectives (see WEB SITES GALORE near the end of this page):

http://www.itunisie.com/nihed/cosas6.html Web site for a list of Spanish adjectives

 

Using multiple adjectives

In English, it is common to use more than one adjective before a noun -- for example, "He's a silly young fool," or "She's a smart, energetic woman." When you use more than one adjective, you have to put them in the right order, according to type.

http://www.englishclub.net/grammar/adjectives/index.shtml Great explanation of the rules to follow when using more than one adjective in a sentence. All the information you need to determine what to teach your client.

The order is: Feelings, Size, Age, Shape, Color, Origin, Material, Purpose and then the noun or pronoun.

 

Sites for practice with multiple adjectives:

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/vm/adjorder.html When using more than one adjective in a sentence, there is a specific way to order them. This quiz tests the order rules.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/adjord1.htm 8 statements. Students are asked to identify, from a multiple choice list, the string of adjectives that is in the correct order.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/adjord2.htm This site offers the student a half a dozen chances to string four adjectives together in the proper order. A graphic, which the adjectives describe, is presented with each string.

http://www.grammar-cat.com/practice/adjectives/The_order_of_adjectives.html Here is both a lesson and an exercise. The lesson is very general and the exercise is fairly simple.

http://www.better-english.com/grammar/adjord.htm Here are twenty short phrases. Students are asked to make a judgment as to whether they sound "natural or unnatural". You could extend this exercise by: 1) asking students why the natural phrase are correct, and 2) have students correct the unnatural phrases.

http://www.better-english.com/grammar/adjord2.htm Here are twenty short phrases and students are asked to make a judgement as to whether they sound "natural or unnatural". You could extend this exercise by; 1) asking students why the natural phrase are correct, and 2) have student correct the unnatural phrases.

http://virtual.parkland.cc.il.us/jforman/parts/adjectives.htm Scroll midway down this web site and you will find five quizzes for adjectives. These are multiple choice quizzes. Appropriate for more advanced students as it requires the student to recognize multiple adjectives within a sentence and then respond to multiple choice answers.

http://www.myenglishteacher.net/adjectivesorder.html This site is a lesson on using multiple adjectives in a sentence. At the end of the lesson there is a quiz. You can skip the lesson and go straight to the quiz.

COMPARATIVES

Comparative adjectives are used to compare two things. http://www.englishclub.net/grammar/adjectives/comparative.shtml This site is a great explanation of comparative adjectives. All the information you need to determine what to teach your client.

This site, http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fdescript.htm, is a list of comparatives and superlatives. It is very extensive.

the trick

When forming the comparative adjective you simply add 'er' to the end of the adjective. The exception is: when the adjective is three syllables or more, you use the word 'more' before the adjective and do not mark the end of it with 'er'.

There are also irregular comparative adjectives such as:

ADJECTIVE COMPARATIVE
good better
bad worse
little less
much

many

some

more
far further

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fenglishplus.com%2Fgrammar%2F00000032.htm This site offers a list of the most commonly used irregular comparatives and superlatives

Sites for practice with comparative adjectives:

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/vm/compsup2.html This site contrasts comparative and superlative adjectives. The adjectives tested deal with quantity, quality and distance concepts.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/regcom1.htm This is a straightforward task. Students are asked to choose from a list, the correct adjective form (either comparative or superlative) of the probe word given. Ten questions. Intermediate level as the contrasts demand children spell the choice correctly.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/regcom3.htm This is a unique site. In this exercise, you have to make a sentence by reordering the words and punctuation. Click on words to add them to the sentence one by one. You must use all the words and punctuation in your sentence. When you think your sentence is complete, click on "Check". If you need help, you can click on the "Hint" button. The "Undo" button will undo your last action if you make a mistake. There are three opportunities. The content of the three exercises is about Canada. Each statement uses either a comparative or superlative adjective.

http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~mbibliow/comparative3-5.html A little information about comparative adjectives and then a 14 item fill in the blank quiz on comparative adjectives.

http://www4.topnet.it/dina/adapt/AdaptEng1/grammar1/exercises/adj ,com, superlative/q_adj-com.htm The first ten questions simply ask the student to place the appropriate comparative ending to a list of words. The second set of ten questions asks the student to fill in the blank with the appropriate comparative adjective.

http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/literacy/PC_comp.htm This is a very easy task. The site offers a chart the student needs to fill out. In the left hand column are adjectives. In the middle and right hand columns the student fills in the comparative and superlative forms.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Ffindsup.htm This site offers a lesson plan for teaching comparatives and superlatives TO A CLASSROOM. It features a task where students are asked to "Find Comparatives and Superlatives in Your World". Fun group activity.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fcompare.htm Here is a fun activity you could do with a single child or with a small group. It not only requires a child to use comparatives and superlatives, but it also gives practice in observation, analysis, defining, and comparing skills.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fwritesup.htm This site is a list of "sets of characters" using comparatives and superlatives. The students task is to pick a set or two and write or tell a story . A fun activity for the more advanced child.

http://members.aol.com/Ccochran50/compquiz1.htm Here is a lesson on comparatives and superlatives followed by a short quiz. Good for beginning level students.

http://www.collegeem.qc.ca/cemdept/anglais/genkno3c.htm High school level. This is a 20 question quiz which asks students to supply the correct comparative or superlative adjective to complete a question. It also asks students to answer the question, which is a test of general knowledge about facts of the world. High level of interest and could stimulate students to seek resource information to answer the questions.

http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/compsupadj1.htm Ten questions in the multiple choice test. Both regular and irregular adjectives are tested. The contrast is between comparative and superlative adjectives.

http://www.learningshortcuts.com/s71/20/chapterA1.html Seventh grade level. This site assesses comparative versus superlative adjectives. Twenty-five questions in this set. Both answers and explanations are given.

http://members.aol.com/Ccochran50/grammar.htm Here is a combination lesson and quiz. The lesson explains adjectives, comparatives, and superlatives in very simple terms. The quiz is a 10 question multiple choice format quiz.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/cmp-sup.html Here is a chart to fill in. Students are given an adjective and are asked to fill in the comparative and superlative forms. This is good for an activity in therapy or as homework.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules1.html Another chart to fill in. These are all one syllable words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules2.html Another chart to fill in. This is a little more tricky as these are all two syllable words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules3.html Another chart to fill in. This is even a little trickier as these are irregular adjectives and adverb words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

.

 

SUPERLATIVES

Superlatives are used to compare more than two things. http://www.englishclub.net/grammar/adjectives/superlative.shtml This is a great explanation of superlative adjectives. All the information you need to determine what to teach your client.

This site, http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fdescript.htm, is a list of comparatives and superlatives. It is very extensive.

the trick

When forming the superlative adjective you simply add 'est' to the end of the adjective. The exception is: when the adjective is three syllables or more, you use the word 'most' before the adjective and do not mark the end of it with 'est'.

There are also irregular comparative adjectives such as:

ADJECTIVE SUPERLATIVE
good best
bad worse
little least
much

many

some

most
far furthest

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fenglishplus.com%2Fgrammar%2F00000032.htm This site offers a list of the most commonly used irregular comparatives and superlatives

Sites for practice with superlative adjectives:

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/vm/compsup.html At this site you'll find a list of adjectives and the student is asked to name the comparative and the superlative forms of the adjective. This is a straightforward drill exercise which is void of contextual clues you would get if the adjective was used in a sentence.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/regcom2.htm This is a fun site. A simple graphic is presented followed by ten cloze type statements. The student's task is to fill in the correct comparative or superlative adjective by looking at the graphic and responding correctly. First letter clues are given if the student needs a hint.

http://www.eflnet.com/index.htm There are ten questions at this site. Students are asked to choose between a comparative or a superlative adjective in order to complete this fill in the blank task.

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/super.htm SPANISH - This web site explains the superlative adjective as it is used in Spanish. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you'll find three free quizzes.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fcompare.htm Here is a fun activity you could do with a single child or with a small group. It not only requires a child to use comparatives and superlatives, but it also gives practice in observation, analysis, defining, and comparing skills.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Fwritesup.htm This site is a list of "sets of characters" using comparatives and superlatives. The students task is to pick a set or two and write or tell a story. A fun activity for the more advanced child.

http://www.factmonster.com/homework/superlativesfaq.html This is an information site. Geography and animals are the two categories featured in this site. You can find information about superlatives such as: What is the tallest building in the world? Where are the tallest mountains? What is the driest place on Earth? What are the richest and poorest countries? What was the worst earthquake ever? What is the fastest animal? What is the smallest country in the world?

http://members.aol.com/Ccochran50/compquiz1.htm Here is a lesson on comparatives and superlatives followed by a short quiz. Good for beginning level students.

http://www.collegeem.qc.ca/cemdept/anglais/genkno3c.htm High school level. This is a 20 question quiz which asks students to supply the correct comparative or superlative adjective to complete a question. It also asks students to answer the question, which is a test of general knowledge about facts of the world. High level of interest and could stimulate students to seek resource information to answer the questions.

http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/compsupadj1.htm Ten questions in the multiple choice test. Both regular and irregular adjectives are tested. The contrast is between comparative and superlative adjectives.

http://www.learningshortcuts.com/s71/20/chapterA1.html Seventh grade level. This site assesses comparative versus superlative adjectives. Twenty-five questions in this set. Both answers and explanations are given.

http://members.aol.com/Ccochran50/grammar.htm Here is a combination lesson and quiz. The lesson explains adjectives, comparatives, and superlatives in very simple terms. The quiz is a 10 question multiple choice format quiz.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/cmp-sup.html Here is a chart to fill in. Students are given an adjective and are asked to fill in the comparative and superlative forms. This is good for an activity in therapy or as homework.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules1.html Another chart to fill in. These are all one syllable words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules2.html Another chart to fill in. This is a little tricker as these are all two syllable words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/crules3.html Another chart to fill in. This is even a little more tricky as these are irregular adjectives and adverb words. Students must fill in both the comparative and superlative form of the adjective.

 

Web sites galore

The following web sites conain a variety of activities for adjectives.

http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/2/unit7.html According to the publisher, Houghton Mifflin, this is a quiz on adjectives appropriate for second grade children. An interesting exercise, as it asks for the meaning the adjective communicates. Answers to the quiz are found at http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/2/ans_key2.html

http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/3/unit4.html According to the publisher, Houghton Mifflin, this is a quiz on adjectives appropriate for third grade children. The quiz tests a child's understanding of the difference between adjectives and adverbs.Answers to the quiz are found at http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/3/ans_key3.html

http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/4/unit4.html According to the publisher, Houghton Mifflin, this is a quiz on adjectives appropriate for a fourth grade child. It contains questions on singleton adjectives as well as comparatives and superlatives. Answers to the quiz are found at http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/4/ans_key4.html

http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/5/unit4.html According to the publisher, Houghton Mifflin, this quiz is appropriate for a fifth grade child. A variety of different adjectives are assessed. Answers to the quiz are found at http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/hme/k_5/quizzes/5/ans_key5.html

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/ck/m-adj.html Just ten matching questions, but a very nice way to teach opposite adjectives.

For advanced students. After learning adjectives and adverbs separately, you may wish to contrast them. The following four quizzes ask for either an adjective or an adverb as the correct response:

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/lb/Adjadv.html
http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/lb/adjadv2.html
http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/vm/adjadv.html
http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/vm/adjadv.html

http://www.eduplace.com/tales/ This is for middle school and high school students. The site is called Wacky Web Tales. The student has to fill out a list of questions asking for different parts of language (several adjectives). Then the site creates a story using your information. Fun exercise, but only for more advanced students.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/cw/1/vm-opadj.html This is a crossword puzzle. Students need to generate an adjective which is an opposite of the clue word. Eight responses are required.

http://www.englishday.com/test/esl/adjectives_ed_ing.htm This quiz tests a very specific notion. Fifteen questions asking the student to make a choice between three alternatives. The student has to choose between using 'ed' or 'ing' inflectional endings on the adjective.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/quizzes/fb005-bp.html At this web site you get practice with possessive adjectives (also known as possessive pronouns).

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/order.htm This is a fairly difficult task. Students are presented with a set of words and are asked to order them into a correct sentence containing an adjective clause. This is a series of exercises and after completion of each one, the student is given a secret letter. What's the secret letter for? Find out, by doing the exercise. This is most appropriate for high school students.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/adjord1.htm There are 8 questions in the exercise. Students are asked to correctly order the multiple adjectives which are presented in the sentences. A multiple choice task. Intermediate level of difficulty.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/adj1.htm A more advanced task. Students are shown two sentences. They are asked to combine the two sentences to make one, using an adjective clause. For example, "I met Mary in the hall. She is a tour guide." becomes "I met Mary, who is a tour guide, in the hall". There are 8 opportunities in this set.

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/adj3.htm Four more questions, similar to the ones in the above web site.

http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/ADJECT.HTM SPANISH - Do you need some information about teaching adjectives in Spanish? Take a look at the information at this site to get you started.

http://teenwriting.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rickwalton.com%2Fcurricul%2Ffindsup.htm This site offers a lesson plan for teaching comparatives and superlatives TO A CLASSROOM. It features a task where students are asked to "Find Comparatives and Superlatives in Your World". Fun group activity.

http://www.kidspeech.com/active.html This site lists a variety of activities to teach shape concepts. Most of the ideas are activities done within the home environment.

http://www.edufind.com/test/flash/test.cfm?NTest=24&TSID=31978 High level task. Student is presented with a sentence and is asked to identify the INCORRECTLY USED adjective. This site uses some very high level graphics, so interest levels ought to remain high. It is, however, a difficult task.

http://www.englishpage.com/holidays/halloween4fr.html Want some Halloween adjectives? This page defines them for you, and then provides an exercise for students to use them.

http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/exercises/adj_noun.html SPANISH - This site allows for practice in changing all the words in short phrases from singular to plural. The exercise highlights plural adjectives and nouns.

http://www.ezschool.com/games/antonymsK_2.html This is a great game. Concentration. Students must match the adjectives that are antonyms. There are several different versions.

http://www.talkeasy.co.uk/link/materials/opp-2.html This site has two sets of adjectives and students are asked to find the pair of words that are opposites. High level vocabulary. Good for upper elementary children.

http://www.manythings.org/vq/mc-adj.html Here's a fun activity for little children. A list of 27 adjectives is available. With each adjective is a set of three pictures. Students must pick out the picture which portrays the meaning of the adjective.

http://www.manythings.org/fq/fq001.html This site tests mostly adjectives such as; little, few, much, many, any, some, little. There are some questions which test prepositions, etc. Fairly easy level and a fun activity.

http://www.manythings.org/wbg/opposites_1-mw.html Here is a concentration game with opposite adjectives. Two can play and compete for the highest score.

http://www.manythings.org/wbg/opposites_1-sw.html This game is called Speedwords. This is a timed game where students compete against the clock. A target word and a series of letters is presented. Students must spell the opposite of the target word as quickly as possible. All of the stimulus words are opposite adjectives.

http://www.manythings.org/wbg/opposites_2-jw.html This is called Jigwords. It is based on a jigsaw puzzle. Two lists of opposite adjectives are shown and students are asked to match the opposite jigsaw pieces.

http://www.manythings.org/wbg/opposites_2-sw.html This game is called Speedwords. This is a timed game where students compete against the clock. A target word and a series of letters is presented. Students must spell the opposite of the target word as quickly as possible. All of the stimulus words are opposite adjectives.

http://www.manythings.org/jumble/adj-people.html This is a scrambled letters game. Adjectives which would describe people (such as: young, sad, short, thin, etc.) are scrambled and students are asked to unscramble them. Fun activity, but demands the student knows how to spell.

http://www.manythings.org/pd/opposites-pd.html In this game students are asked to drag the correct opposite adjective to fit in a sentence.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/v/s/ab-adj-people.html SPANISH - Adjectives to describe people are presented in English. Students are asked to choose the correct Spanish adjective match from five alternatives listed. There are 54 different words in this activity.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/v/s/ab-adj-personalities.html SPANISH - This is a little higher level task. Adjectives to describe personalities are presented in English. Students are asked to choose the correct Spanish adjective match from the alternatives listed. There are 79 words used in this exercise.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/v/s/ab-adjectives.html SPANISH - Here are 93 randomly selected adjectives presented in English. Students are asked to choose the correct Spanish adjective from a field of five. Correct responses are rewarded with an "OK" sign. Incorrect answers result in the correct response being displayed.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/v/s/ab-opposites_adj.html SPANISH - This site displays a pair of opposite adjectives in English. Students are asked to find the equivalent pair in Spanish from among the five alternatives presented. There are 37 questions.

http://www.aitech.ac.jp/~iteslj/v/s/idp-adjectives.html SPANISH -This site is huge. It contains 563 adjectives. The adjectives are presented in English and students are asked to find the Spanish equivalent. This site might be most useful for advanced students, but it has a skip function, so clinicians could just skip the ones they didn't want. Some of the vocabulary words are not very commonly occurring.

http://itc.sulross.edu/raustin/adjectiv.htm Here's a site for older students. You can print out this page and have students underline all the adjectives (including the articles) in this paragraph from Eudora Welty's famous short story, "A Worn Path."

http://www.learningshortcuts.com/s41/12/chapterA1.html Fourth grade level. This exercise asks students to identify the adjectives and/or articles in short sentences. Explanations of why answers are correct are provided.

http://www.learningshortcuts.com/s51/05/chapterA1.html Fifth grade level. Several different types of adjectives are tested (Proper, Predicate, Comparative, Demonstrative) in this 25 question exercise. Answers and explanations are given.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie1v_opposites1.htmA concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: tall, heavy, soft, hot, poor, white, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie1v_opposites2.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: big, happy, fast, top, thin, start, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie2v_opposites1.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: difficult, cheap, ugly, warm, dry, north, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie2v_opposites2.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: over, high, more, safe, front, clever, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie3v_opposites1.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: wise, rough, boring, ancient, stale, rise, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie3v_opposites2.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: wide, borrow, sharp, above, hard-working, exit, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie4v_opposites1.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: brave, enormous, delicious, valuable, common, polite, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie4v_opposites2.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: import, sensible, minimum, relaxed, knowledgeable, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie5v_opposites1.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: permanent, military, urban, pessimistic, transparent, harmful, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie5v_opposites2.htm A concentration game. Opposite adjectives. Six pairs of words: allow, vertical, strict, humble, succeed, loss, and their opposites. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms01.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: start, little, street, quick, sad, boat, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms02.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: finish, tired, closed, sea, right, big, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms03.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: smart, near, hard, noon, center, rock, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms04.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: clean, noise, chair, sick, leave, easy, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for little children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms05.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: jail, wealthy, sure, nearly, try, happen, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms06.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: package, impolite, hurt, aim, fix, surprised, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms07.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: argue, mistake, cautious, opportunity, sufficient, convince, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms08.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: purchase, strange, rule, permit, select, urge, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms09.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: naughty, worried, dependable, admit, recall, expect, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://www.teflgames.com/msie_synonyms10.htm A concentration game. Synonym adjectives. Six pairs of words: lucky, furious, extraordinary, ecstasy, definitely. topic, and their synonyms. Easy level. Fun game for older children.

http://atschool.eduweb.co.uk/parkfld/homework/index.html Here's a homework assignment. Have the students add adjectives to the following sentences to make them more interesting for the reader. Students could generate their own, or use a list provided by the clinician.

http://atschool.eduweb.co.uk/parkfld/homework/page10.html Here's a web page called Synonym Challenge. Students are asked to use a thesaurus to find synonyms for the underlined words in the following sentences.

http://www.rhlschool.com/eng3n18.htm Easy level. Eight sentences are presented. Students are asked to choose the antonym of the underlined word in each sentence. All of the choices from the multiple choice list might make sense in the sentence, but only one of them is the antonym. Fun for younger children.

http://www.rhlschool.com/eng3n4.htm There are a dozen sentences in this exercise. Students are instructed to read each sentence carefully and underline the adjectives. The first four sentences have been done for you. Each sentence below contains one or more adjectives.

http://www.eduplace.com/cgi-bin/hme-quiz-directions.cgi?Grade=2&Unit=7&Topic=Adjectives This is a game called Grammar Blast. Game Rules 1. Each game has 10 questions.  Each question has 4 answer choices. 2. Read the question and choose the answer you think is correct.  Then click the Are you right? button. 3. If you're right on the first try, you'll get 10 points. If you're right on the second try, you'll get 5 points. If you miss the second time, we'll give you the right answer. This is second grade level.

http://www.eduplace.com/cgi-bin/hme-quiz-directions.cgi?Grade=3&Unit=4&Topic=Adjectives+and+Adverbs This is a game called Grammar Blast. Game Rules 1. Each game has 10 questions.  Each question has 4 answer choices. 2. Read the question and choose the answer you think is correct.  Then click the Are you right? button. 3. If you're right on the first try, you'll get 10 points. If you're right on the second try, you'll get 5 points. If you miss the second time, we'll give you the right answer. This is third grade level.

http://www.eduplace.com/cgi-bin/hme-quiz-directions.cgi?Grade=4&Unit=4&Topic=Adjectives This is a game called Grammar Blast. Game Rules 1. Each game has 10 questions.  Each question has 4 answer choices. 2. Read the question and choose the answer you think is correct.  Then click the Are you right? button. 3. If you're right on the first try, you'll get 10 points. If you're right on the second try, you'll get 5 points. If you miss the second time, we'll give you the right answer. This is fourth grade level.

http://www.eduplace.com/cgi-bin/hme-quiz-directions.cgi?Grade=5&Unit=4&Topic=Adjectives This is a game called Grammar Blast. Game Rules 1. Each game has 10 questions.  Each question has 4 answer choices. 2. Read the question and choose the answer you think is correct.  Then click the Are you right? button. 3. If you're right on the first try, you'll get 10 points. If you're right on the second try, you'll get 5 points. If you miss the second time, we'll give you the right answer. This is fifth grade level.

http://members.aol.com/Ccochran50/games.htm This is a real fun hangman game. All the answers are adjectives. The game gives you the meaning of the adjective you must guess. It also keeps track of the letters you choose as you try to discover the answer.

http://www.better-english.com/grammar/adjthe.htm There are 20 questions in this multiple choice quiz. All the answers are adjectives with no nouns. All the answers are "The + some adjective".

http://www.better-english.com/grammar/few.htm A 20 question quiz which requires students to know the correct usage of the adjectives "few and little".

http://www.better-english.com/grammar/adjadv.htm Students have to decide whether to use an adjective or an adverb. Twenty multiple choice questions.

http://www.english-zone.com/teach/adjadv1.html Here is a multiple choice task but with only two choices. Students are asked whether an adjective or an adverb fits into the sentence. There are 30 chances to respond. This might be a good activity for a group of students taking turns on successive questions.

http://www.esl-lab.com/opp1.htm This is kind of fun. The student clicks on PLAY and hears a voice say an adjective. Then they have to pick the correct opposite adjective from a set of three.